25th International Conference of FFC - 13th International Symposium of ASFFBC

Encounters of Functional Foods and Asian Traditional Medicines

October 27 – 28, 2018, Ritsumeikan University, Osaka-Ibaraki Campus, Osaka, Japan

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The Functional Food Center (FFC) is excited to announce the FFC’s 2018 International Conference titled “Encounters of Functional Foods and Asian Traditional Medicines.” This conference will be held on October 27 – 28, 2018 at Ritsumeikan University, Osaka-Ibaraki Campus in Osaka, Japan. The aim of this conference is to bring together leaders and experts in the field of functional foods to discuss and share ideas utilizing functional foods for medicine to combat various diseases. This conference will bring together experts in medicine, biology, and the food industry to discuss the functional foods with bioactive compounds as dietary interventions for chronic diseases.

Main Conference Sessions:

  • Functional Food Definition and the Status in Japan and USA
  • Japanese traditional medicine (Kampo medicine)
  • Traditional medicines in China, Taiwan, South Korea, and Indonesia
  • Traditional medicines and functional foods
  • Functional Food Ingredients: Sources and Potential Benefits in Public Health
  • Immunomodulation by Functional Foods: Promising Concept for Chronic Disease and Healthy Aging
  • Functional Foods and Chronic Diseases
  • Prevention and Management of Dementia
  • Current Research and Development of New Functional Food Products

Call for Abstracts:

The abstract submission deadline extented to September 17th, 2018, 5 pm (PST). The entire abstract should have a maximum of 1,000 words, up to three pages (including references). There is no up-front fee for submitting a conference abstract. Once the abstract is generally accepted for the conference, the corresponding/first author is responsible to pay the abstract publication fee of $49 within 10 days. Failure to pay the abstract publication fee within 10 days after abstract acceptance day will result in a late abstract publication fee of $99. First authors are expected to register, pay the conference and abstract fee, and present the paper (if submission is accepted). In the case of an emergency and the author(s) are unable to attend the conference, they are required to pay an abstract publication fee of $99. Decisions on selection will be promptly communicated to the authors via e-mail. All contributions will be reviewed, and accepted abstracts will be published in the conference proceedings book. Please email your abstract as an attachment to ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. Please review our sample abstract.

There is no charge for the withdrawal of an abstract before July 31, 2018. In the case that the first author cannot attend the conference and present, he or she must contact the conference organizing committee via e-mail at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com, to provide notification of withdrawal or to request a substitute presenter. Withdrawals must be received before July 31, 2017.

Please note: Abstracts withdrawn after July 31, 2018, will be published and the first author will be expected to pay the abstract publication fee. The conference does not provide financial support nor registration fee waivers for any presentations.

To avoid the last-minute rush, submit your abstract in advance. For any information concerning publications please contact us at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. For more information about abstract submission, click here.

Instructions for Poster Presenters:

Poster presentations allow the audience to get a clear visual of the presenters' work in a simple format. The reasonable size for posters is 2.5 - 3.0 feet high by 3.5 - 4 feet wide.


Poster Presentation Recommendations:

The poster should clearly present the title, the author(s), affiliation(s), and a description of the research, along with highlighting the abstract's major elements.Remember that pictures, tables, and figures are key to any poster display. At least 50% of the surface area should be used for photos, graphs, or diagrams. Good use of color and the use of black or dark blue for text. Too much color can be hard to read! One or two large, high-quality photographs attract attention. Make the title large and clear! Include author(s) name(s) and address(es). Your poster title should be easily readable from 3 - 4 meters away. We recommend the following sections on the poster: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Tables, Figures, Results, and Conclusions. For more information about poster sessions, please click here.

Registration Fees:

The registration fee will cover the Conference Proceedings book (Abstract book) and lunches and refreshments for two days. It will also cover a 12-month membership to the Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds. Each registration allows the registrant to present up to 3 accepted abstracts maximum.

Cancellation Policy: Before January 15, 2018: 75% refund; before July 15, 2018: 50% refund; after July 15, 2018: No refund. Reimbursements will be sent after the conference. Notice of cancellation of registration must be received in writing to the Conference Secretariat, at: ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. All refunds will be provided after the conference within 14 days.

You may click here to make a payment for the conference registration fee.

Conference registration fees are in USD 

 

Discounted Registration Fee

May 10th to June 10th, 2018

Registration

  July 10th to August 10th, 2018

              Registration              

August 10th to September 10th

Full-Time Student Nonmembers*

Full-Time Student Members of ASFFBC*

225.00

185.00

275.00

225.00

325.00

275.00

Dietitians and Retired Professionals*

Members of  ASFFBC

275.00

225.00

325.00

275.00

375.00

325.00

Academic (Researchers and Professors at Universities)

Members of ASFFBC

555.00

455.00

605.00

505.00

645.00

555.00

Food and Medical Industry -Nonmembers

Members of ASFFBC

$555 

$455 

655.00

555.00

705.00

605.00

Exhibitor/Vendor 675.00 775.00
Abstract Publication Fee 49.00 49.00 49.00
Evening Networking Reception

Included in Conference Registration Fee Included in Conference Registration Fee Included in Conference Registration Fee

*Must present ID

Please note: space at this conference is limited and will be allocated on a first come, first served basis.

Students enrolled in an undergraduate program (MS, Ph.D. or MD) are eligible for the Student Discount rate. When you register for the conference, you must enter your mentor's name and Email address during checkout to verify your student status.


Paper Submission:

The abstract submission deadline extented to September 17th, 2018, 5 pm (PST). Full-text papers for oral presentations or posters should be submitted before October 20, 2018.  Power Points for oral presentations should be submitted before October 21, 2018. Please send all documents to ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com.

Please note that the program and sessions are subject to change.

For more information about the conference, please contact us by e-mail at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com. For international calls, please use: 469-441-8272, Toll free: 1-866-202-0487


Sample Abstract 1 (Research)

Diacylglycerol for obesity: serotonin hypothesis

Hidekatsu Yanai1, Hiroshi Yoshida2, 3, Yuji Hirowatari4, and Norio Tada3

1Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 21567-0345, Japan; 2Department of Laboratory Medicine, Jikei University School of Medicine, Chiba, 31567-0345, Japan; 3Internal Medicine of Metabolism and Nutrition, Jikei University Graduate School of Medicine, Chiba, 41567-0345, Japan; 4Bioscience Division, TOSOH Corp, Kanagawa, 51567-0345, Japan

Corresponding Author: Hidekatsu Yanai, Ph.D., Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 21567-0345, Japan

Keywords: diacylglycerol, intestine, obesity, serotonin, thermogenesis

Background: Diacylglycerol (DAG) oil is a natural component of various edible oils. DAG has been reported to prevent obesity through a variety of potential mechanisms in comparison with triacylglycerol (TAG) in humans. An increase in postprandial energy expenditure (EE) is proposed to be one of the mechanisms underlying this effect of DAG. Up-regulated mRNA expressions associated with EE by DAG in the small intestine may explain increased postprandial EE. The small intestine seems to contribute to changes in EE by DAG. We previously studied plasma serotonin, which is mostly present in the small intestine and mediates sympathetic thermogenesis. We found that DAG ingestion increases plasma serotonin levels by approximately 50% compared to TAG ingestion.

Objective: To understand the molecular mechanisms for DAG-induced increase in serotonin and EE, we investigated effects of DAG on serotonin release and expressions of genes associated with EE, using the human intestinal cell line.

Methods: The intestinal cell line, the Caco-2 cells, was incubated with medium containing 1-monoacylglycerol (1-monooleyglycerol [1-MOG]) and 2-monoacylglycerol (2-monooleylglycerol [2-MOG]), distinctive digestive products of DAG and TAG, respectively. We measured serotonin release from the Caco-2 cells using a newly developed high-performance liquid chromatography. Further, we studied effects of 1-MOG, 2-MOG, and serotonin on expressions of mRNA associated with EE (acyl-CoA oxidase [ACO], medium-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenase [MCAD], fatty acid translocase [FAT], and uncoupling protein-2 [UCP-2]), by the Real-Time quantitative RT-PCR system.

Results: 100 mM 1-MOG significantly increased serotonin release from the Caco-2 cells compared with the same concentration of 2-MOG by approximately 37% (P<0.001). Expressions of mRNA of ACO, FAT, and UCP-2 were significantly higher in 100 mM 1-MOG-treated Caco-2 cells than 100 mM 2-MOG-treaed cells by approximately 13%, 24%, and 35%, respectively. Expressions of mRNA of ACO, MCAD, FAT, and UCP-2 were significantly increased in 400 nM serotonin-treated Caco-2 cells as compared with the Caco-2 cells incubated without serotonin by approximately 29%, 30%, and 39%, respectively.

Conclusion: Our study demonstrated that a hydrolytic product of DAG increases serotonin release from the intestinal cells and enhances expressions of genes associated with b-oxidation (ACO, MCAD), thermogenesis (UCP-2) and fatty acids metabolism (FAT). Furthermore, this study revealed that serotonin also enhances expression of these genes, proposing a new molecular biological mechanism for DAG-mediated anti-obesity effect. Serotonin may play an important role in DAG-mediated prevention of obesity.

(Please note: the portion below is required for our records, but will not appear in the published abstract)

FFC's 22nd International Conference

Corresponding Author: Hidekatsu Yanai, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 01567-0345, Japan, e-mail: hy@gmal.com, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 464-6955

Main Presenting Author: Hidekatsu Yanai, Ph.D., Professor, Department of Internal Medicine, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Kohnodai Hospital, Chiba, 01567-0345, Japan, e-mail: hy@gmal.com, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 464-6955

Co-authors:

Hiroshi Yoshida, MD, Ph.D., e-mail: hyoshida@gmal.com

Yuji Hirowatari, Ph.D., e-mail: yhir@gmal.com

Norio Tada, MS, e-mail: mtada@gmal.com

Presentation Type (please choose one): Oral or poster

Session (please choose one): Choose one from the conference website

Sample Abstract 2 (Review)

Definition for functional food by FFC: Creating functional food products using new definition

April Mitchell and Danik Martirosyan

Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, 75252, USA

Corresponding Author: Danik M. Martirosyan, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, 75252, USA

Keywords: Functional food definitions, bioactive compounds, biomarkers

ABSTRACT

Healthcare costs in industrialized countries are soaring as a result of rising average life expectancies and epidemics of specific chronic diseases. As the public pursues ways to become healthier and improve quality of life, functional food science has become an intriguing field of research and topic of debate to combat certain chronic diseases cost-effectively. While steps are being taken to develop and research functional food consistently across the globe, there is still not a shared international or conclusive definition of functional food. The term “functional food” was first coined in Japan in the 1980’s and the science expanded to EU and the United States quickly. However, the term “functional food” has since been the center of confusion in scientific and consumer discussions due to shifting definitions. Inconsistent definitions in the literature and government legislation have posed challenges for the development of functional food science and have caused public doubt in the effectiveness of functional food as a potential strategy for chronic diseases.

Here, the Functional Food Center’s new definition for “functional foods” was revised to: “Natural or processed foods that contains known or unknown biologically- active compounds; which, in defined, effective non-toxic amounts, provide a clinically proven and documented health benefit for the prevention, management, or treatment of chronic disease” [1,2]. In this latest version of our definition, we added the phrase “in effective non-toxic amounts” to highlight the significance of bioactive compound dosage in the consumption of functional food. This new definition of functional food by the Functional Food Center can improve communication and collaboration between the scientific, medical communities, food industry, and the public to legitimize functional food science globally.

References:

Danik M. Martirosyan and Jaishree Singh, A new definition of functional food by FFC: what makes a new definition unique? Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2015; 5(6):209-223

Danik M. Martirosyan and Jaishree Singh, Introduction to Functional Food Science, Third Edition, Edited by Martirosyan DM, Dallas: Food Science Publisher; 2015:10-24

(Please note: the portion below is required for our records, but will not appear in the published abstract)

FFC's 22nd International Conference

Corresponding Author: Danik Martirosyan, Ph.D., Research and Development Department, Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, 75024, Plano (Dallas), USA, e-mail: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 202-0487

Main Presenting Author: Danik Martirosyan, Ph.D., Research and Development Department, Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, 75024, Plano (Dallas), USA, e-mail: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net, phone number: (001) 469-441-8272, secondary phone: (866) 202-0487

Co-authors:

April Mitchell, BSc, e-mail: ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com

Presentation Type (please choose one): Oral or poster: Oral

Session (please choose one): Choose one from the conference website: Session: Functional Food Definition and the Status of Functional Foods in Japan, USA and other Countries

Abstract Submission

The abstract submission deadline extented to September 17th, 2018, 5 pm (PST). The entire abstract should have a maximum of 1000 words. Please use Times New Roman Font 12 for the entire abstract.

The first author of the research is considered the primary author and must present. One person may be the primary author for a maximum of 3 abstracts. However, only one abstract may be presented as an oral presentation with the other presented as a poster, or both abstracts may be presented as posters.

1. All abstract submissions must include research-based data to allow for a thorough review.

2. Abstracts must contain the following:

  • Title
  • Author(s) – do not include degree acronyms (i.e., BS, MS, Ph.D., etc.)
  • Primary Institution/Laboratory Name, City, State, and Country
  • Body of the abstract

3. The body of abstract should contain the following sections:

  • Keywords
  • Background
  • Methods
  • Results
  • Conclusions

4. Abstracts cannot contain the following:

  • Brand names
  • Advertisements. Research abstracts should be free from solicitations and should not contain demonstrations of products for the purpose of sales. Exhibitor’s tables are available for the purpose of advertisement and sales

5. Abstracts can contain either one picture, one graph, or one table (no combinations)

  • A graph or table must be embedded into the abstract and cannot exceed 1/3 of the page
  • Any graph or table must pertain to the abstract for the purpose of visualizing data and must be referred to in the text of the abstract
  • Pictures, tables and graphs should be no bigger than 4 1/2 in. (W) x 4 1/2 in. (L)
  • Keep in mind that all images will be displayed in black and white

6. Please also provide the following information:

  • Corresponding author(s)
  • Primary/Presenting author's name
  • Primary author's professional mailing address, e-mail address, and phone number
  • Desired presentation format (oral, poster, etc.)
  • Session name
  • Co-authors' e-mail addresses

Please note: the portion of abstract is required for our records, but will not appear in the published abstract and accordingly will not included in word count. Please send your abstract to the ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com via the attached file.

Also note: article submission to the Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease is mandatory for the oral presenters.

Click here for the sample abstract.

Abstract Accepted for the Presentation: 

Poster presentation recommendations:

  • Poster presentations give the audience a clear visual of the presenter's work in a simple format. The reasonable size for posters is 2.5-3.0 feet high by 3.5-4 feet wide.
  • Present the title, the author(s), affiliation(s), and a description of the research, along with highlighting the abstract's major elements.
  • Minimize detail and try to use simple statements. Keep it short and easy to read.
  • Remember that pictures, tables, and figures are key to any poster display.
  • If possible, use color in your visuals.
  • Don't overwhelm the audience with excessive information. Instead, construct a display that enhances the presentation.
  • At least 50% of the surface area should be used for photos, graphs and diagrams.
  • Use a clear structure and layout.
  • Use complementary colors. Use black or dark blue for text. Too much color can be hard to read!
  • One or two large, high quality photographs attract attention.
  • Your title should be a condensed statement of the main idea of your poster. It should be large and clear.
  • Your poster title should be easily readable from a distance of 3-4 meters. Include author(s) name(s), and address(es).
  • We recommend the following sections on the poster: Abstract, Introduction, Methods, Tables, Figures, Results, and Conclusions.
  • Please confirm your poster number on the list. The posters with odd numbers will be presented on October 27, 2018 and the posters with even numbers will be presented on October 28, 2018.
  • Please put up your own poster in the position indicated by your presentation number by noon of each day. Presentation numbers are already indicated on display panels. Please check your presentation number and be careful to put up your poster on the correct panel. Please use pins to put up posters. Please do not use glue or sellotape.
  • Please present your work in front of your own poster during the poster session.
  • The best poster presentation award will be chosen by votes of all participants.
  • Posters will be changed every day. Please help by taking your own poster down. Posters still displayed after the removal time has passed will be disposed of by the secretary the following day.

For more information on oral presentation please visit conference program page.

Abstracts Accepted for Presentation:


O* -  abstract for oral presentation

P** - abstract for poster presentation

O1. Francesco Marotta. Mitochondrial and redox dysfunction in post-menopause as risk factor of neurodegenerative disease: testing the role of a validated Asian functional food.

O2. Yasuhito Shirai. Methylated epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) as functional food for diabetic nephropathy.

O3. Raymond L. Rodriguez. Impact of Diet-Derived Signalling Molecules on Human Cognition: Exploring the food-Brain Axis.

O4. Almagul Kushugulova. Saumal, mare's milk as a perspective functional food product.

P1. Ademola C Famurera. Polyphenols isolated from virgin coconut oil protects against cadmium hepatotoxicity in rats via improvement in antioxidant defense system.

O5. I-Shu Lee. Medicinal Mushroom Taiwanofungus camphoratus: A potential cure for cancer.

O6. Lujuan Xing. γ-glutamylvaline (EV) promoted the expression of PPAR-γ to prevent the low-grade chronic inflammation in adipocytes in vitro.

P2. FE Ejezie. Polyphenols isolated from virgin coconut oil protects against cadmium hepatotoxicity in rats via improvement in antioxidant defense system.

O7. Shan Huang. Integrated Medical Treatment of Psoriasis.

O8. Dinia Rizqi Dwijayanti. The anti-inflammatory effects of Indonesian and Japanese bitter melon (Momordica charantia L.) extracts in interleukin-1β-treated hepatocytes.

P3. Younghwa Kim. Effects of unsaponifiable matter from okra seed on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 cells.

P4. Heike Englert. The effects of a functional food, high in mono-, di-, oligo- and polysaccharides, on the blood sugar level in type 1 diabetes during a 10-km run.

P5. Yukiko Matsuo. Daisaikoto, a Japanese traditional medicine used to treatment obesity, inhibits pancreatic lipase activity.

P6. Samat Kozhakhmetov. Clinical efficiency of mare's milk in children.

O9. Ana Lúcia Barretto Penna. Buriti (Mauritia flexuosa) - a Brazilian native fruit - as a potential functional ingredient to enrich fermented milk.

P7. Yuki Nagamori. Japanese sake yeast supplementation reduces daytime fatigue via sleep quality improvement: a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial.

P8. Yusuke Nakamura. L-Carnitine inhibits induction of inducible nitric oxide synthase gene expression in hepatocytes.

P9. Jong-Hwa Kim. Polyphenols Isolated from Rubuscoreanus Miquel root Inhibits the Development of Induced Atopic Dermatitis-like Lesions in NC/Nga Mice.

P10. Cleonara Yanuar Dini. Pumpkin Powder Downregulated Sterol Regulatory Element Binding Protein- 1c (SREBP-1c) Expression and Reducing Triglyceride Level in Dislipidemia Rats Model.

O10. Richi Nakatake. Glutathione inhibits the expression of proinflammatory biomarker inducible nitric oxide synthase in hepatocytes.

O11. Juliana Janet M. Puzon. Inflorescence, leaves and fruit peels of banana varieties as sources of bioactive secondary metabolites with antioxidant and antimicrobial activities.

P11. Dian Laila Purwaningroom. The Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme Inhibitor of Indonesia Herbs that may Benefit ­for Antihypertension Therapy.

P12. Chihiro Matsumoto. A limonoid from andiroba, Carapa guianensis, Meliaceae suppresses lipid accumulation in adipocytes

P13. Hisakazu Kobayashi. Effect of Zingiber Zerumbet Smith extract on thermotolerance.

P14. Chul Sang Lee. Probiotic Fermented Milk Product Preventing Glucocorticoid-Induced Secondary Osteoporosis via up-regulating BMP-2 Signaling Pathway Related Genes.

P15. Kanae Nakamura. Effect of lactoferrin on energy expenditure enhancement in reprogrammed functional brown adipocytes.

O12. Ryou Sakamoto. Active Hexose Correlated Compound modulates the expression of endogenous EphA2 antisense RNA and suppresses the human breast carcinoma cell proliferation.

O13. Shaoyu Wang. What can yeast tell us about aging modulation by bioactive substances in functional food?

O14. Yoshinori Mine. Extracellular Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) as a new molecular target improving gastrointestinal chronic inflammation

O15. Shigeru Katayama.  Modulation of neuroprotective factors by bioactive food components and its mechanistic exploration

P16. Negar Jamshidi. Impact of Holy basil (Tulsi) on biomarkers of cardiometabolic risk: Evidence from meta-analysis

Guidelines for Full Paper Submission:

Participants with accepted abstracts may write full articles:

Congratulations. You have been chosen out of the many who have submitted abstracts to submit a full length article to our journals. As we know this is an international conference, we will also be providing professional help with the English quality and proof-reading of your manuscripts.

Articles should be 7-15 pages in length. If you submit an article within the deadline, you can get a 50% discount for article publication fee. Full-text papers should be submitted before October 21st2018 We are extending the deadline as some of the other authors are asking for another week extension. 

We want to stress how excellent an opportunity this is. Conference participants will be able to submit articles to our journal with a 50% discount and get published within 2-3 months. Furthermore, all published articles will be advertised in our LinkedIn groups and newsletters, which will increase exposure and citation for your articles.

Please note that article submission is mandatory for oral presenters. If you published your research in another journal already, let us know as soon as possible. Another option is to submit a review article on a similar topic.

You can visit our our journal website at: www.ffhdj.com. You can submit your articles via the journal email to editor@ffhdj.com. If you have any other questions, let us know.

  1. The entire text of the full papers must be in Times New Roman, 12 point size font.
  2. Full paper margins should be 0.75 inches from the top and bottom, and 1.0 inch from the left and right for A4 format paper.
  3. Line spacing should be 1.15 and alignment justified.
  4. The submitted full papers should contain 6-16 pages. A shorter or longer manuscript must be discussed with the organizing committee.
  5. When submitting a full paper, the corresponding author should send a cover letter indicating that the authors have not submitted a similar manuscript for publication elsewhere. Full papers submitted without cover letters will not be published.
  6. The full papers and cover letter should be submitted as separate attachments to the following email address: ffc_usa@sbcglobal.net.
  7. Submit the full paper within 2 months following the date in the abstract acceptance letter, but no later than the date mentioned on the conference website.
  8. Full papers will be published in FFC’s Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease. Please download and use the suggested samples for an original scientific paper, review paper, and cover letter.
  9. As a token of our appreciation for article submissions in the Special Issue, we are offering 50% discount off our standard publication fee. The final cost will be $348.00 for BCHD and 447 for FFHD journal. If sufficient scientific funds are unavailable for coverage of the discounted publication fee, ASFFBC is willing to accommodate as needed. Please contact us (in advance) for more details, if necessary. Don't miss your chance to be a part of this!
  10. Full-text papers should be submitted before October 21st, 2018 to get 50% discount. We are extending the deadline as some of the other authors are asking for another week extension. 

Conference Awards

The conference will have the following awards, which will be announced and presented during the conference closing session.

  • Best Oral Presentation Awards
  • Best Poster Presentation Award
  • Best Full Paper Award
  • Best Special Session Organizer Award

The author of an awarded presentation will be entitled to:

  • A signed official award certificate;
  • The announcement of their achievement on a special conference webpage;
  • one year membership of the ASFFBC. If already an ASFFBC member, then this offer adds one year to her/his current membership.
  • A personal voucher for a 50% reduced registration fee in one event sponsored by FFC, valid during a 12-month period. This voucher is only available if the presenter attends the closing session and receives the award.

Best Full Paper Award

Best full article will be chosen from participants who submit their full article to the journal of Functional foods in Health and Disease. Article should be generally accepted for publication (decision will be made by the Editorial Team of journal).

Best Special Session Organizer Award

Special sessions are small and specialized events to be held during the conference as a set of oral and poster presentations with a highly specialized theme. The goal of special sessions (minimum 4 presenters; maximum 7) is to provide a focused discussion on innovative topics.

Selection Criteria

The awards will be presented to the author(s) at the time of conference, selected by the Conference Committee and Session Chairs.

The decision criterion will consider both the paper quality and the presentation quality (feedback given by main conference organizers, session chairs, and organizing committee members at the conference venue).

 Main Conference Organizers

  • Mikio Nishizawa, Co-chairman,  MD, Ph.D., Professor, College of Biomedical Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga, Japan
  • Danik Martirosyan, Co-chairman, Ph.D., President, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, USA
  • Yasuhito Shirai, PhD, Professor, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Department of Agrobioscience, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan
  • Kenji Sato, PhD, professor, Graduate School of Agriculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan
  • Jun Nishihira, PhD, Professor, Department of Medical Management and Informatics, Hokkaido Information University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido,  Japan

25th International Conference of FFC - 13th International Symposium of ASFFBC

Encounters of Functional Foods and Asian Traditional Medicines

October 27 – 28, 2018, Ritsumeikan University, Osaka-Ibaraki Campus, Osaka, Japan

Register Now


Conference  Program


October 27, 2018

8:15 -8:45 Registrations

8:45-8:55 Kazuo Kojima, PhD, Dean, College of Life Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Osaka, Japan. Welcoming Remark

8:55-9:20 Danik Martirosyan, PhD, President, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, USA. Opening Remarks: FFC's Advancement of Functional Food Definition: Using this definition to evaluate scientific evidence

Session 1Special Lectures

9:20-9:50 Yasuhito Shirai, PhD, Professor, Department of Applied Chemistry in Bioscience, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Kobe
University, Kobe, Japan. Methylated epigallocatechin gallate (EGCg) as functional food for diabetic nephropathy

9:50-10:30 Hiroshi Maeda, PhD, Keynote Speaker, Nobel Prize Nominee for 2016, Professor Emeritus Kumamoto University (Med); Senior Invited Professor of Osaka University Medical School Director, and Director at BioDynamics Research Foundation, Kumamoto, Japan. Part 1: Cancer Problems, Free Radicals and Dietary Intervention; Part 2:Vigorous extracts of Meshimakobu mushroom (Phellinus linteus) and Kumaizasa bamboo (Sasa senanensis) leaf suppress cancer growth and carcinogenesis by oral administration 

10:30-10:45 Coffee Break

Session 2: Japanese Traditional Medicine (Kampo Medicine). Session Chair: Dr. Mikio Nishizawa

10:45-11:15 Mikio Nishizawa, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga, Japan. Anti-inflammatory effects of Japanese Kampo drugs and functional foods

11:15-11:45 Yukinobu Ikeya, PhD, Professor, Daiichi University of Pharmacy, Fukuoka, Japan.  Medicinal effects of food and crude drugs in relation to taste

11:45-12:15 Hojun Kim, PhD, OMD, Professor, Department of Rehabilitation Medicine of Korean Medicine, Dongguk University, Goyang, Gyeonggi-do, Republic of Korea. Flos Lonicera combined with metformin ameliorates hepatosteatosis and glucose intolerance in association with gut microbiota modulation

12:15-13:15 Lunch

Session 3: Functional Food Ingredients: Sources and Potential Benefits in Public Health. Session Chairs: Dr. Hajime Fujii and Dr. Nashi Widodo

13:15-13:45 Almagul Kushugulova, MD, Head of Human Microbiome and Longevity Laboratory, National Laboratory Astana, Nazarbayev University, Astana, Republic of Kazakhstan. Saumal, mare's milk as a perspective functional food product

13:45-14:15 Hajime Fujii, PhD, President, Amino Up Chemical Co., Ltd., Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan. Challenge empowering life with the power of nature

14:15-14:45 Nashi Widodo, PhD, Professor, Biology Department, Brawijaya University; Jl veteran, Malang, Indonesia. Introduction to Indonesia Traditional medicine of JAMU: from nature to the clinic

14:45-15:00 Coffee Break

Session 4: Traditional Medicines in China, Taiwan, South Korea, and Indonesia. Session Chairs: Dr. Mikio Nishizawa and Dr. Djati

15:00-15:30 I-Shu Lee,  Antrodia cinnamomea Association of Taiwan Treasure, Taipei city, Taiwan. Medicinal Mushroom Taiwanofungus camphoratus: A  potential cure for cancer

15:30-15:50 Shan Huang, MD, Director of VCC Preventive Medical Promotion Foundation, Director of the World Federation of Chinese Medicine societies, Diabetes Branch, Beijing, China. Integrated Medical Treatment of Psoriasis

15:50-16:20 Dinia Rizqi Dwijayanti and Mikio Nishizawa, MD, PhD, Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Japa n. The anti-inflammatory effects of Indonesian and Japanese bitter melon (Momordica charantia L.) extracts in interleukin-1β-treated hepatocytes

16:20-17:10 Poster Session (Session 5)

17:30-19:30 Evening Networking Reception: On the evening of October 27, 2018, we will be holding an enjoyable networking opportunity with us from 17:30-19:30 including live music. All attendees and speakers are welcome to come. This event will also be providing refreshments and appetizers, including beer, wine, champagne, Italian cheeses, salads, and more. Space is limited, and advance online registration is required. Please let us know if you are interested (ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com) 

October 28, 2018

Session 6: Traditional Medicines and Functional Foods: Session Chairs: Juliana Janet M. Puzon and Dr. Yosuke Hirayama

8:30-9:00 Juliana Janet M. Puzon, PhD, Institute of Biology, College of Science, University of the Philippines, Diliman, Quezon City, Philippines. Inflorescence, leaves and fruit peels of banana varieties as sources of bioactive secondary metabolites with antioxidant and antimicrobial activities

9:00-9:30 Ryou Sakamoto and Tominori Kimura, MD, PhD, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, College of Pharmacy, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga, Japan.  Active Hexose Correlated Compound modulates the expression of endogenous EphA2 antisense RNA and suppresses the human breast carcinoma cell proliferation

9:30-9:50 Xiaoxiong Zeng, PhD, Professor, College of Food Science and Technology, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing 210095, Jiangsu, China. Simulated digestion and in vitro fermentation by human gut microbiota of polysaccharides from the fruits of Lycium barbarum

9:50-10:20 Yosuke Hirayama, PhD, Amino Up Co., Ltd., Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan. Effect of Welsh onion (Allium fistulosum L.) green leaf extract on immune response in healthy subjects: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study

10:20-10:30 Coffee Break

Session 7: Functional Foods and Bioactive Compound(s): Prevention and Management of Non-communicable Diseases. Session Chairs: Dr. Francesco Marotta and Dr. Kenji Sato

10:30-11:00 Shaoyu Wang, PhD, School of Community Health, Charles Sturt University, Orange, Australia.  What can yeast tell us about aging modulation by bioactive substances in functional food?

11:00-11:30 Francesco Marotta, MD, PhD, ReGenera R&D International for Aging Intervention, Milano, Italy. Mitochondrial and redox dysfunction in post-menopause as risk factor of neurodegenerative disease: testing the role of a validated Asian functional food.

11:30-12:00 Richi Nakatake, MD, PhD, Assistant Professor, Department of Surgery, Kansai Medical University, Hirakata, Osaka, Japan. Glutathione inhibits the expression of proinflammatory biomarker inducible nitric oxide synthase in hepatocytes

12:00-12:30 Kenji Sato, PhD, Professor, Graduate School of Agriculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan. Presence of asparatic isopeptides in formulated liver protein hydrolysate-Structure and bioavaialbility

Lunch: 12:30-13:15

Session 8: Nutrition, Inflammation and Chronic Diseases . Session Chairs: Dr. Yoshinori Mine and Dr. Jun Nishihira

13:15-13:40 Jun Nishihira, PhD, Professor, Department of Medical Management and Informatics, Hokkaido Information University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan . Epigallocatechin-rich green tea “Yabukita” increases serum adiponectin level: Investigation of its mechanism of action by exome analysis

13:40-14:00 Lujuan Xing, PhD Student, Department of Food Science, University of Guelph, Guelph, Ontario, Canada and Key Laboratory of Meat Processing and Quality Control, Nanjing Agricultural University, Nanjing, China. γ-glutamylvaline (EV) can prevent the low-grade chronic inflammation via the activation of CaSR pathway using a mouse 3T3-L1 cell model 

14:00-14:20 Shigeru Katayama, PhD, Faculty of Agriculture, Shinshu University, Nagano, Japan. Modulation of neuroprotective factors by bioactive food components and its mechanistic exploration 

14:20-14:45 Yoshinori Mine, PhD, Professor, Department of Food Science, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada. Extracellular Calcium-Sensing Receptor (CaSR) as a new molecular target improving gastrointestinal chronic inflammation

14:45-14:55 Coffee Break 

Session 9: Current Research and Development of New Functional Food Products: Session Chairs: Dr. Mikio Nishizawa and Dr. Danik Martirosyan

14:55-15:25 Akira Uchiyama, PhD, Director of Wellness Research Laboratories, Research & Development Headquarters, Lion Corporation, Tokyo, Japan. Development of “Foods with function claims” in Japan: Effect of lactoferrin's visceral fat reduction and deep sleep increase of sake yeast

15:25-15:50 M. Sasmito Djati, PhD, Professor, Brawijaya University, East Java, Indonesia. Rempah-Rempah Indonesian traditional food flavor toward modern functional food and herbal medicine 

15:50-16:35 Poster Session: Session 10

16:35-16:40 Awards and Certificates

16:40-17:00 Conference Closing

Please note: Schedule subject to change.

Exhibitors Information:

All vendors have a separate exhibitor table at the conference. The two tables will be located near the conference area and will have sufficient access to conference participants. The international conference will attract many experts from food processing companies, universities, research centers, and related industries from around the world, such as local restaurants and bakeries. This will be a great opportunity to introduce yourself to many international organizations. The cost for vendors is $795.00, which includes one (1) full registration for the conference.

There is a limited amount of space. Please purchase your conference registration ticket and provide your company description, which will appear on the conference website with your sponsorship level, or exhibit booth, listed alongside a hyperlink to your website. Limit the company description to no more than 35 words.

You can fill out the registration form and make a payment for the registration fee to become a vendor for this International Conference. An email confirmation will be sent within two days of the submission date.

If you have any questions, feel free to email us at ffc@functionalfoodcenter.com

FFC's Exhibitors at Harvard Medical School (from previous conference)

  • BESO Biological Research Inc., 21660 Copley Dr. Ste# 180, Diamond Bar, CA 91767, USA. Website: http://besoinc.com/home.html. Based in CA, U.S.A. BESO develops nutritional products ranging from daily nutrition to supportive needs. Our products are made with 100% fermented foods that help increase bioavailability and improve nutrient absorption. Our formulation contains a natural (non-synthetic) bio-active compound called 13-Methyltetradecanoic acid.

BESO Logo

  • Danem Dairy Products, Inc., Suleyman Demirel University Technopark, East Campus, 32260 Isparta, Turkey. Web Site: http://www.kefirdanem.com. Danem’s purpose is to protect, maintain and produce genuine kefir grains that contain all of the probiotic bacterial and yeast strains naturally found in traditional kefir. From these grains, we produce our traditional kefir product, Kefirzadem™, with no additives. Using our kefir grains produces kefir with the highest level of natural strains and a magnificent flavor. After a long academic research period, our significant scientific and technical knowledge was transferred to an industrial scale at Danem, Inc. Along with other patent-pending technology, Danem holds three patents on natural kefir and yogurt production from non-GMO, natural probiotic microflora. Danem is the first company in the world that produces significant amounts of non-GMO natural kefir grains, kefir starter culture, natural kefir from kefir grains as well as probiotic yogurt starter culture. Continued research indicates that consumption of our products can contribute significantly to improved health.

Danem Dairy Products Logo

  • Food Science Publisher, 4659 Texas St, San Diego CA, USA. Website: http://functionalfoodscenter.net/food-science-publisher.html. Food Science Publisher is especially interested in human clinical nutrition, functional food science and chronic disease aspects of the publishing field. The company specializes in publishing books in the field of food science, nutrition, functional foods and chronic diseases.

Publisher Logo

  • Vibrant America, 1021 Howard Avenue Suite B, San Carlos, CA 94070-4034, USA. Website: https://www.vibrant-america.com/. Vibrant strives to become the leader in autoimmune diagnostics. Our platform allows us to provide results 4 days sooner than any other regional or specialized laboratory. We are committed to providing the best services and a clinically relevant menu of testing options to accommodate healthcare providers and their patients.

Vibrant America

  • Lifeway Foods, Inc., 6431 West Oakton St. Morton Grove, IL 60053, USA. Website: http://lifewaykefir.com/. Lifeway Foods, America’s leading supplier of the probiotic fermented beverage known as kefir, is on a mission to provide the best probiotic and nutritious foods to consumers. Lifeway has also innovated several new ideas in the dairy industry by introducing breakthrough products. The company is committed to four ideals: all natural hormone and GMO-free ingredients, philanthropy, environmental responsibility, and local farming sustainability.

Lifeway Logo

Osato Research Institute, 1956 Inatomi, Ono-cho, Ibi-gun, Gifu, 501-0501, Japan. Website: http://en.ori-japan.com/. Osato Research Institute works with universities and institutes around the world to support research on FFP® (Fermented Papaya Preparation) and its effect on healthy aging. One of their many goals to is to reduce medical costs associated with aging through preventative therapeutic strategies and education.

FPP Round Logo

ORI Logo

Registration Form

Potential Guest Speaker

Danik Martirosyan, PhD, President,  Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, USA. Opening Remark

Kazuo Kojima, PhD, Dean, College of Life Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Osaka, Japan. Welcoming remark

Akira Uchiyama, PhD, Director of Wellness Research Laboratories, Research & Development Headquarters, Lion Corporation, Tokyo, Japan

Hajime Fujii, PhD, President, Amino Up Chemical Co., Ltd., Sapporo, Hokkaido, Japan

Yukinobu Ikeya, PhD, Professor, Daiichi University of Pharmacy, Fukuoka, Japan

M. Sasmito Djati, PhD, Professor, Brawijaya University, East Java, Indonesia

Yoshinori Mine, PhD, Professor, Department of Food Science, University of Guelph, Ontario, Canada

Yoko Niiyama, PhD, Professor, College of Economics, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Japan

Mikio Nishizawa, MD., PhD, Professor, Department of Biomedical Sciences, College of Life Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga, Japan

Yasuhito Shirai, PhD, Professor, Graduate School of Agricultural Science, Department of Agrobioscience, Kobe University, Kobe, Japan

Kenji Sato, PhD, professor, Graduate School of Agriculture, Faculty of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto, Japan

Jun Nishihira, PhD, Professor, Department of Medical Management and Informatics, Hokkaido Information University, Ebetsu, Hokkaido, Japan

Francesco Marotta, MD, PhD, Professor, ReGenera Research Group for Aging Intervention, Milan, Italy

I-Shu Lee, PhD, Antrodia cinnamomea Association of Taiwan Treasure, Taipei city, Taiwan. Medicinal Mushroom Taiwanofungus camphoratus: A potential cure for cancer

Almagul Kushugulova, PhD, Professor, Head of Human Microbiome Lab, Center for Life Sciences, NLA, Nazarbayev University, Astana, Republic of Kazakhstan. Saumal, mare's milk as a perspective functional food product (Presentation Pending)

Raymond L. Rodriguez, PhD, Professor, Department of Molecular & Cellular Biology, Executive Director, Global HealthShare, UC Davis, University of California, Davis, CA, USA. Impact of diet-derived signalling molecules on human cognition: Exploring the food-brain axis

Lujuan Xing, PhD candidate, Department of Food Science, University of Guelph, Guelph Ontario, Canada. γ-glutamylvaline (EV) promoted the expression of PPAR-γ to prevent the low-grade chronic inflammation in adipocytes in vitro

Dileep Sachan, PhD, Professor Emeritus, Department of Human Nutrition, University of Tennesse, Knoxville, Tennesse, USA

Shigeru Katayama, PhD, Faculty of Agriculture, Shinshu University, Nagano, Japan. Modulation of neuroprotective factors by bioactive food components and its mechanistic exploration

Danik Martirosyan, PhD, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute, Dallas, TX, USA. Advancement of healthy and functional food definition: Food classification by health benefits

Sponsorship Opportunities

Dear Future Sponsor,

I wish to inform you about an excellent sponsorship opportunity for your company to gain high-quality exposure in the health food industry. Functional foods and bioactive compounds are currently receiving an increased amount of attention from the scientific community, as well as the public. The Functional Food Center’s 25th International Conference will be held at Ritsumeikan University, Osaka-Ibaraki Campus, Osaka, Japan. It will be timely in presenting new and relevant information focused on the importance of bioactive compounds and functional foods.

Cherry Blossoms

Since 1998, the Functional Food Center has been a pioneer in the functional food industry. It combines cutting-edge expertise in the biomedical sciences with practical business experience, to aid further research, development, and commercialization of functional food innovations in both domestic and international markets. The Functional Food Center connects a global network of professionals (scientists, functional food experts, and food industry representatives) to a conducive environment for innovative research collaboration. Since 2004, the FFC has organized conferences together with top universities. Scientists, researchers, and food industry professionals present their research and discoveries about healthy, functional, and medical foods with bioactive compounds. In response to the growth of this field, we are proud to introduce the Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds. This society of medical doctors, scientists, dietitians, nutritionists and other food and medical industry professionals will be strictly dedicated to the research and development of functional and medical foods, bioactive compounds, and the discovery of new ingredients.

Partnering with the Functional Food Center by sponsoring our upcoming conference will provide your company with several valuable benefits. These include but are not limited to:

1) Your names and logos endlessly stay on our website, which has about 11000 visitors per month, and have an opening rate of 13% for the newsletter.

2) Your logo will be included in the conference website, promotional materials, and Functional Food Center’s bi-monthly newsletter, which is received by over 800,000 readers including scientists, medical doctors, nutritionists and dieticians.

3) FDA, USDA, and NIH representatives attend our conferences, and you may contact them directly at the time of conference.

4) An option for annual and lifetime sponsorship.

5) Each level of sponsorship will contain a certain number of attendee rights, which allow free-of-charge admission to our conference.

6) You will have the unique opportunity to meet with decision-makers in this field, receive information/support on how to make a new, healthy product, and provide oral presentations about a related topic.

7) The Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds and Functional Food Center can advise you on how to create a new, healthy and functional product (this can be a separate discussion).

We look forward hearing from you.

Sincerely,

Danik M. Martirosyan, PhD

President of Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds,

Founder of Functional Food Center, Inc.

Sponsorship Prospects

Please join us for an exciting opportunity!

We are pleased to invite you to a conference in Osaka, Japan, on October 27 – 28, 2018.

The Functional Food Center, The Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease, Academic Society for Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds would all be honored for you to join us at our conference. We will bring together experts in medicine, biology and the food industry to discuss the contribution of functional/medical foods and bioactive compounds in the prevention and management of chronic diseases.

With over 175 expected participants, the conference provides a great opportunity to increase the visibility of your company and exhibit products and services to an international group of researchers, clinicians, post-docs and next-generation scientists.

Sponsors and exhibitors will be exposed to a wide audience and will have many promotional opportunities.

Below are details regarding the sponsorship and exhibitor packages. We hope you find the right package for your needs. We look forward to collaborating with you in the future, and hope to see you in Osaka, Japan.

Since 2004, the Functional Food Center has organized conferences where scientists, researchers, and food industry professionals present their discoveries in the realm of functional foods and bioactive compounds.

The Functional Food Center is a valuable resource for businesses in the food industry. The benefits of sponsorship include but are not limited to:

  • Developing various connections through conference participation, such as medical doctors, food scientists, food industry representatives, dieticians and nutritionists.
  • Information on the latest research and discoveries in the realm of functional foods and bioactive compounds, to develop, market and commercialize healthy products.
  • The ability (if eligible) to gain recognition in the food industry by joining our board of Medical and Food Industry Experts.

Sponsorship funding goes to support conference organization and conference promotion. We are also willing to work with companies who are interested in specifically sponsoring student registration, student travel, international scientist travel, conference lunches, conference receptions, or abstract book publication.

Co-chairman: Mikio Nishizawa, Co-chairman, MD, Ph.D., Professor, College of Biomedical Sciences, Ritsumeikan University, Kusatsu, Shiga, Japan

Co-chairman: Danik M. Martirosyan, Ph.D., President, Functional Food Center/Functional Food Institute; Editor-In-Chief, The Journal of Functional Foods in Health and Disease, Dallas, TX, USA.

Sponsorship Levels and Benefits:

  Diamond Platinum Gold Silver Bronze
Sponsorships Available 1 2 3 6 No Limit
Cost $40,000 $20,000 $10,000 $5,000 $2,500
Attendee Rights 5 Free 4 Free 3 Free 2 Free 1 Free
Lifetime Sponsorship Yes            
Annual Sponsorship Yes Yes              
*Display Table Yes Yes Yes Yes    
Logo Included in Conference Website Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Logo Included in Promotional Materials Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Acknowledgement in Abstract Book Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
Distribution of Company Brochure Yes Yes Yes Yes Yes
**Conduct Special Session Yes Yes Yes        
***Logo Included in Newsletters Yes Yes Yes        
Logo Displayed in Meeting Room Yes Yes          
****Advertisement in Abstract Book Yes (1 Page) Yes (1 Page) Yes (1/2 Page)      
Logo Included on Conference Folder Yes Yes         
Signage Rights Yes            

*At each conference, an area is reserved for exhibitors. However, because our conferences are held at universities, space is limited. Therefore registration is on a first-come, first-served basis.

**Your company may conduct their own special session regarding a specific topic of your choice at the conference. This is an excellent way to connect with possible collaborates with similar interests.

***Your company’s logo will be included (and linked to your company website) in our bi-monthly Functional Foods in Health and Disease Journal newsletter. It has over 450,000 subscribers including scientists, medical doctors, dietitians and nutritionists. The logo will also be included in our newsletter for the Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds, which has over 2,000 members.

****In addition to the acknowledgement, Gold sponsors will receive a ½ page of advertising space in the abstract book, and both platinum and diamond sponsors will receive a full page of advertising space. This is a great way to promote your company and its products.

If you have any questions or need additional information, please contact us.

  Benefits Cost
Sponsorship for Scientific Sessions
(4 available)

Sponsor recognition at the beginning of the scientific session

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program, abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$5,000 each
Social Activities Welcome Reception
(1 available)

Sponsor recognition by room signage

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$4,500 partial

$9,000 exclusive

Badges and Lanyards Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites $2,000 exclusive
Pens Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites $2,000 exclusive
Bags Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites $2,000 exclusive
Lanyards, Pens, Badges and Bags

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$5,000 each
Conference Book Advertisement

The sponsor can place one (1) full-page advertisement (black and white) at the end of the conference program and abstract book

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$1,000
Exhibitors

Provided with one table close to the conference area with sufficient access to coneference participants

Company description on FFC website

Includes one (1) full registration admission

$1,195
Lunches (2 available)

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

One lunch per day; two lunches over two days

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

$2,000 per day

$3,500 exclusive

Daily Tea and Coffee Breaks
(5 available)

Five breaks over three days

Sponsor name and logo will be included in the conference program and abstract book and websites

Name/logo will be included in every upcoming newsletter to more than 450,000 readers including medical doctors, scientists, etc.

$1,000 per day

$4,000 exclusive

Banquet (1 available)     $6,000

Terms of Agreement

  1. Sponsorship will be awarded on a first-come, first-serve basis. Sponsorship will not be reserved until full payment is received.
  2. The sponsor is responsible for all materials, printing, customization and shipping-related costs associated with supplying the logo materials to FFC
Our Partners and Media Sponsors:

Functional Food Center - FFC

Ritsumeikan University            Ritsumeikan University

The Academic Society of Functional Foods and Bioactive Compounds

Lion

Amino Up Chemical Tamagokichi

FFHD

Molecular Sciences

BCHD

ReGenera

AMJ

EJCN

Technology Networks Logo

Suggested Conference Sessions and Topics

Session 1: Functional Food Definition and the Status in Japan, USA, and other Countries

  • The regulations, policy, and labeling of functional foods in Japan
  • Weaknesses and strong points of FOSHU/Food for Special Health Usage
  • What is the status of Functional Foods in the USA? Expert opinions from NIH, USDA, and FDA
  • How the new definition of Functional Foods can help to improve the status of functional foods word wide

Special Session 2: Japanese traditional medicine (Kampo medicine)

  • Kampo medicine: Differences between functional food, crude drugs, and low MW drugs
  • Crude herbal drugs in Kampo medicine: How they can be used as functional foods
  • Japanese traditional medicine (including Kampo medicine): How to assess its constituents
  • Japanese traditional medicine: How to evaluate its activity on disease
  • Pre-disease ('Mibyo' in Japanese): How to treat Mibyo with Kampo medicine consisting of functional foods

Special Session 3: Traditional medicines in China, Taiwan, South Korea, and Indonesia

  • Chinese, Taiwanese, or Korean traditional medicines: Differences from Japanese traditional medicine
  • Indonesian traditional medicine (Jamu): What is Jamu? Is Jamu crude herbal drugs or functional foods? Principles and Recipes of Jamu
  • Pharmacological aspects of Jamu, such as anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetic, and anti-cancer effects

Special Session 4: Traditional medicines and functional foods

  • How to find new functional foods using traditional medicine
  • Food science: Qualification and quantification of beneficial components (e.g., HPLC and biological assays)
  • Functional foods for animals, such as fish (as replacement for antibiotics)
  • Development of functional foods on the market
  • Food economics: food industries and functional foods on the market

Session 5: Functional Food Ingredients: Sources and Potential Benefits in Public Health

Session 6: Functional Foods for Chronic Diseases

6a: Nutrition, Functional, and Medical foods for Obesity

  • Epidemiology of obesity
  • The modern mechanisms of obesity; energy metabolism and obesity; neurobiological mechanisms of obesity; microbiological mechanisms of obesity; pathophysiologic mechanisms of obesity
  • Biomarkers of obesity
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of obesity
  • Nutrition, Functional, and Medical foods for obesity

6b: Nutrition, Functional, and Medical foods for Diabetes

  • Epidemiology of diabetes
  • The modern mechanisms of diabetes
  • Biomarkers of diabetes
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of diabetes
  • Nutrition, Functional, and Medical foods for diabetes

6c: Nutrition, Functional, and Medical foods for Neurological Diseases

  • Epidemiology of mental and neurological diseases
  • Mechanisms of neurological diseases
  • Biomarkers of different mental and neurological diseases
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of neurological diseases
  • Functional foods for mental and neurological diseases
  • Nutrition, Functional and Medical foods for neurological diseases

6d: Nutrition, Functional, and Medical foods for Cardiovascular Diseases (CVD)

  • Epidemiology of CVD
  • Biomarkers of different cardiovascular diseases
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of cardiovascular diseases
  • Nutrition, Functional, and Medical foods for CVD

6e: Nutrition, Functional, and Medical foods for Cancer

  • Epidemiology of Cancer
  • Biomarkers of different types of cancer
  • The effects of functional food and bioactive compounds on biomarkers of different types of cancer
  • Nutrition, Functional, and Medical Foods for the Cancer

Session 7: Functional Foods with Bioactive Compound(s): Prevention and Management of Non-communicable Diseases

  • Functional foods and other non-communicable diseases
  • Bioactive compounds and other non-communicable diseases
  • The effects of medical food on biomarkers of non-communicable diseases

Session 8: Safety of the Bioactive Compounds and Functional Foods

  • Food-Drug Interactions
  • Safety of bioactive compounds at efficacious levels
  • Safety of functional foods at efficacious levels
  • Regulatory issues and health claims

Session 9: Biomarkers and Functional Food

  • Biomarkers and functional foods
  • Biomarkers available for assessing diet-related changes
  • How can biomarkers improve functional food products development process?
  • The importance of Monitoring Biomarkers in Functional food Science
  • FDA’s Biomarker Qualification Program and creation of new functional foods

Special session 10: Bioavailability of bioactive compounds:

  • Food structuring and bioaccessibility/ bioavailability
  • Edible delivery systems for bioactive compounds
  • Micro- and nano-encapsulation
  • Impact of processing technologies/conditions on bioaccessibility/ bioavailability
  • Underlying mechanisms of bioaccessibility/ bioavailability

Session 11: Current Research and Development of New Functional Food Products.

  • Incentives for functional food research and development
  • Consumer acceptance of functional food products
  • Functional food composition and dietary intake databases
  • Food vehicles for delivery bioactive compounds
  • Research, development and marketing of new functional food products

Session 12: Nutritional Approach to Manage Chronic Allergies with Asian Traditional Medicine and Functional Foods

  • Chronic allergies: What causes them and what are the symptoms?
  • Asian Traditional Medicine in the management of food allergy
  • Functional foods in the management of food allergy
  • Dietary management of chronic food allergy in children
  • The role of nutrition in the development and functioning of the immune system
  • The role of prebiotics and probiotics in the prevention of chronic allergy

25th International Conference of FFC - 13th International Symposium of ASFFBC

"Encounters of Functional Foods and Asian Traditional Medicines"

October 27 – 28, 2018, Ritsumeikan University, Osaka-Ibaraki Campus, Osaka, Japan


Welcome Letter

The Functional Food Center (FFC) is excited to announce the FFC’s 2018 International Conference titled “Encounters of Functional Foods and Asian Traditional Medicines.” This conference will be held on October 27 – 28, 2018 at Ritsumeikan University, Osaka-Ibaraki Campus in Osaka, Japan. We will be celebrating the 10th anniversary of the College of Life Sciences and the College of Pharmaceutical Sciences at Ritsumeikan University. The aim of this conference is to bring together leaders and experts in the field of functional foods to discuss and share ideas utilizing functional foods for medicine to combat various diseases.

The Functional Food Center currently defines “functional foods” as “natural or processed foods that contains known or unknown biologically-active compounds; which, in defined, effective non-toxic amounts, provide a clinically proven and documented health benefit for the prevention, management, or treatment of chronic disease.” Functional foods contain bioactive compounds to combat and treat nutrition-related diseases and can increase the physical and mental well-being of people. The idea of functional foods was first introduced in Japan in the early 1980s, and the functional food industry has since rapidly developed to become accepted throughout many countries around the world. Functional foods have become a very lucrative market in many Asian countries and have had a substantial growth in the past five years. There is typically less awareness of healthcare and healthcare facilities in Asia, which lead people to rely on functional foods as a source to prevent against diseases and illnesses. The use of medicinal herbs from foods has long been used in Asian culture for treating a vast variety of health ailments. Recent research on both functional foods and traditional Asian medicines have shown there to be many interlinking factors from both to be used to treat illnesses.

Dr. Mikio Nishizawa of the College of Biomedical Sciences at Ritsumeikan University will be co-chair of this conference. He began working at Ritsumeikan University in 2007 and has been studying about an antisense transcript-mediated mechanism to post-transcriptionally regulate the expression of the genes that are involved in inflammation, such as inducible nitric oxide synthase gene. Functional foods that affect the expression of these genes are other important targets of his research. Dr. Nishizawa was an outstanding lecturer in our previous 19th International Conference held in Kobe, Japan. We are excited to be working with Dr. Nishizawa again to make this conference a huge success.

Along with the other organizing committee members from universities throughout Japan and the FFC, Dr. Mikio Nishizawa proudly welcomes all to Ritsumeikan University and Osaka, Japan. We hope to bring together experts and those interested in the connection between Asian traditional medicines and functional foods to further discuss the progress in this field so far. We also hope to attract experts in the field of functional foods from around the world to present their findings on the use of functional foods to promote health and prevent disease. Osaka has much to offer with its rich culture and blend of modern architecture and nightlife. The 16th-century shogunate Osaka Castle is one of the major historical landmarks to visit, and the unique varieties of street foods are not to be missed. We look forward to welcoming you our conference at Ritsumeikan University and enjoy the robust culture of Osaka, Japan.

We would like to invite anyone interested in speaking or organizing special sessions for the conference. Organizers will be responsible for creating a special sessions and finding speakers who would like to speak in their session. Speakers and organizers will need to provide a short bio (with image) and biosketch. Again, we are very excited to present to you the 2018 International Conference by the FFC held at Ritsumeikan University, Osaka-Ibaraki Campus in Osaka, Japan: “Functional Foods and Asian Traditional Medicines,” and appreciate your efforts to make this conference a success.

Venue and Accommodation

Kusatsu campus

This conference will be held on October 27 – 28, 2018 at Ritsumeikan University, Osaka-Ibaraki Campus in Osaka, Japan. Please read on to find more information regarding the venue, hotel, and possible places to visit while staying in Boston!

Venue

Ritsumeikan University, Osaka-Ibaraki Campus 

The conference will be held at the Ritsumeikan University, Osaka-Ibaraki Campus. 

Ritsumeikan University Osaka Ibaraki Campus


Ritsumeikan University Osaka Ibaraki Campus Map: http://en.ritsumei.ac.jp/file.jsp?id=246777&f=.pdf

Map of Ritsumeikan University Osaka Ibaraki Campus


Description of Osaka Ibaraki (http://en.ritsumei.ac.jp/lifecareer/about/)

Ibaraki city is located between Kyoto and Osaka, Japan’s third-largest city. While having many ancient tombs including the Oda Chausuyama-kofun Burial Mound (Mausoleum of Emperor Keitai), the city is well supplied with commercial districts, supermarkets and large shopping centers near the stations and across the city. The northern part of Ibaraki city is filled with scenic nature including the Oinosaka mountain range and Tanba Plateau. Ritsumeikan University Osaka Ibaraki Campus is built in an urban area situated in the southern half of the city. There are also many parks and areas of greenery within the city, one of which being the remarkable Expo ’70 Commemorative Park.

The history of Ritsumeikan dates back to 1869 when Prince Kinmochi Saionji, an eminent international statesman of modern Japan, founded "Ritsumeikan" as a private academy on the site of the Kyoto Imperial Palace. In 1900, Kojuro Nakagawa, former secretary of Prince Saionji, established Kyoto Hosei School, an evening law school that was open to working people. This school formally adopted the name Ritsumeikan in 1913 and was finally given the status of a university in 1922. 

Today, Ritsumeikan University offers a wide range of courses in advanced studies at its Kinugasa Campus in Kyoto, Biwako-Kusatsu Campus (BKC) in Shiga and Osaka Ibaraki Campus (OIC) in Osaka. The year 2000 marked the 130th anniversary of the founding of the Ritsumeikan private school and the 100th year of the establishment of Ritsumeikan University.

Osaka Ibaraki

Ibaraki city is located between Kyoto and Osaka, Japan’s third-largest city. While having many ancient tombs including the Oda Chausuyama-kofun Burial Mound (Mausoleum of Emperor Keitai), the city is well supplied with commercial districts, supermarkets and large shopping centers near the stations and across the city. The northern part of Ibaraki city is filled with scenic nature including the Oinosaka mountain range and Tanba Plateau.

Accommodations: Recommended Hotels

1. Hotel name: Hotel Crest Ibaraki

Address: Matsugamotocho 1-8, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0033, Japan

TEL: +81-72-620-2020
FAX +81-72-624-9112

Website: http://www.hotel-crest.co.jp/crest_ibaraki/

2. Hotel name: Hotel Crest Dio Ibaraki

Address: Ekimae 1-3-2, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0888, Japan

TEL: +81-72-620-1010
FAX +81-72-622-4666

Website: http://www.hotel-crest.co.jp/crest_dio/index.html


Closest station:

Located just outside JR Ibaraki Station, Hotel Crest Ibaraki offers convenient access to Osaka, Kyoto and Kobe. Great for both business and leisure travelers with easy access from Kansai Airport, this 165-room hotel features a relaxing large public bath featuring an outdoor bath, as well as meeting rooms and a restaurant offering breakfast service. Rooms feature a modern decor and come equipped with a TV, refrigerator, as well as several other convenient amenities. LAN and WiFi service available as well.

One min walk from JR Ibaraki station ( Ibaraki station is 10 min by train from Shin-Osaka station ) / 70 min by Express Limousine Bus from Kansai International Airport / 30 min by Osaka Monorail from Osaka International Airport ( also known as Itami Airport )

2. Hotel name: Hotel Crest Dio Ibaraki

Address: Ekimae 1-3-2, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0888, Japan

TEL: +81-72-620-1010
FAX +81-72-622-4666

Website: http://www.hotel-crest.co.jp/crest_ibaraki/

Tourism:

Universal Studios Japan: Theme Park; Universal Studios Japan, located in Osaka, is one of four Universal Studios theme parks, owned and operated by USJ Co., Ltd., which is wholly owned by NBCUniversal.   http://www.usj.co.jp

Osaka Castle: Osaka Castle is a Japanese castle in Ch??-ku, Osaka, Japan. The castle is one of Japan's most famous landmarks and it played a major role in the unification of Japan during the sixteenth century of the Azuchi-Momoyama period  https://www.osakacastle.net

Dotonbori: The name “Dotonbori” generally refers both to the Dotonbori Canal and to Dotonbori Street which runs parallel to the canal’s southern bank. It is one of the most colorful areas in Osaka and an absolute must-visit location when traveling through Kansai region. The lively entertainment area of Dotonbori is Osaka’s most famous tourist destination and renowned for its gaudy neon lights, extravagant signage, and the enormous variety of restaurants and bars. https://www.osakastation.com/dotonbori-area-the-bright-heart-of-osaka/

Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan: The Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan is an aquarium located in the ward of Minato in Osaka, Japan, near Osaka Bay. It is one of the largest public aquariums in the world, and is a member of the Japanese Association of Zoos and Aquariums.  http://www.kaiyukan.com

Shitenno-ji: Shitenno-ji is a Buddhist temple in ?saka, Japan. It is sometimes regarded as the first Buddhist and oldest officially administered temple in Japan, although the temple buildings have been rebuilt over the centuries.  http://www.shitennoji.or.jp

Nishinomaru Garden: Picturesque city park known for its manicured lawns, sculpted topiary & cherry blossoms.  https://osakacastlepark.jp

Umeda Sky Building, Kuchu Teien Observatory: The observation platform of this observatory is a bridge connecting the two towers of the Umeda Sky Building, whose roof features a doughnut shape that provides an unobstructed 360-degree view. While enjoying the breathtaking sights you can also directly feel the wind?which at 170 meters off the ground can get quite strong. From this observatory you can not only see all of Osaka but as far away as Awaji Island. The basement of the building houses the Takimi-Koji gourmet street with old fashioned images of Osaka from the 1920s.  https://osaka-info.jp/en/page/umeda-sky-building

Tempozan Ferris Wheel: Tempozan Ferris Wheel is located in Osaka, Japan, at Tempozan Harbor Village, next to Osaka Aquarium Kaiyukan, one of the largest aquariums in the world. The wheel has a height of 112.5 metres and diameter of 100 metres.  http://www.senyo.co.jp/tempozan/

Tennoji Zoo: The zoo's approximately 11 hectares house 1,000 animals of 200 different types, including everything from lions, and chimpanzees, to the always-popular koalas, New Zealand kiwis (which can only be viewed at the Tennoji zoo), and distinctive, black-headed drills. In addition to attempting to reproduce the animals' natural habitats as closely as possible, the Tennoji Zoo also serves as a kind of ecological exhibition, introducing the public to the way these animals live. 

http://www.city.osaka.lg.jp/contents/wdu170/tennojizoo/

https://osaka-info.jp/en/page/osaka-tennoji-zoo